Credibility in asylum claims

Legal Updates

Lack of credibility is the main reason that asylum claims are refused by the Home Office.

This means that the Home Office does not believe you have a well-founded fear of persecution – either because they don’t believe you are telling the truth about what has happened in the past, or that you are not really a member of a category of people that has been proved to be likely to face persecution.

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moped passengers in Afghanistan

What do the Home Office say about Afghanistan?

Legal Updates

The Home Office’s statistics on asylum decisions show that for the 302 decisions made on Afghan asylum claims between April and June 2017, 100 resulted in the granting of refugee status; 4 in the granting of humanitarian protection; 2 grants of discretionary leave; 44 ‘other grants’; and 152 refusals of Afghan asylum claims.

Given the frequent, deadly attacks on Kabul and many other areas in Afghanistan, the refusal of roughly half of the asylum claims considered may seem somewhat surprising. On what basis are the Home Office making these decisions?

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image of someone giving testimony about persecution

Preparing for the asylum interview – from those who have been there

Legal Updates

Over the years of working with people going through the asylum and immigration system, we have seen how disastrously unprepared most people are going into their asylum substantive interview.

This is one of the reasons we produce the Right to Remain Toolkit, and why we’re working with a new group in Sheffield to help new asylum-seekers prepare for their asylum interview.

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Charter flight deportations: ‘ghost flights’ that stop access to justice

Legal Updates

Last night, activists blockaded Stansted Airport to stop the departure of the scheduled charter flight mass deportation to Nigeria and Ghana. At the time of writing, the blockade continues and the charter flight has not departed. Why have activists taken such a drastic action?

Charter flight removals/deportations are one of the shadiest aspects of the UK’s asylum and immigration process.

Shielded from public oversight, information protected from freedom of information requests, every month these ‘ghost flights’ forcibly remove people en masse from the UK.

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