If you have claimed asylum, and do not have anywhere to live and/or money to support yourself (you are “destitute”), you may be entitled to  “asylum support”.  This is administered by the Home Office and includes housing – if needed – and basic living expenses.

Image from www.blackbirdtree.org.uk Not everyone has the right for their asylum claim to be heard in the UK.  If you are an adult and you claim… Read more »

It’s difficult enough understanding a court judgment in your own case or for someone you know, and understanding important case law is even tricker.  Other case law – country guidance cases, or important cases that set out the right procedure or application of legal principles or policies – may have important implications in your case or a case you are involved in.  Without knowing the case well, and only having the written judgment to go on, it can be difficult to know what a significant case means and how you may be able to apply it to your situation.

At one of the training sessions we ran this week with volunteers who are keen to learn more and do more for people seeking the right to remain in the UK – we looked at evidence.  What ‘evidence’ means, in the context of asylum, immigration and human rights cases.  How someone can get this evidence, and how others can help them.  We discussed how important documentary evidence is, when so many legal cases are refused on the basis of credibility – the Home Office or the courts don’t believe you are telling the truth.

Following on from our earlier post about the value placed on letters of support from the Lesbian Immigration Support Group in a fresh claim (read that post here), in this post we look at a 2018 case from the Inner House of the Court of Session in Scotland.

solidarity

At Right to Remain’s annual gathering in Sheffield last week, we got together many of the grassroots asylum and migrants support groups we work with and shared collective learning and experiences of navigating the UK’s asylum and immigration system.

One of the topics of discussion was fresh claims.

EU Flag

In August, the government launched a trial (with NHS workers, university staff and students in the North West of England) of the EU Settlement Scheme.  However, we still do not know for certain the process for applying for the right to remain in the UK after Brexit.  The process could depend on the deal that the UK agrees (or otherwise) with the EU; and subsequent legislation.

What we do know is that there are likely to be groups of people who are eligible for settled status, who do not or cannot access it.

street in the Calais camp

In September, the UK government announced a new form of leave to remain in the UK for children transferred to the UK to reunite with their families during the Calais camp clearance in 2016.

With government cuts to legal aid and the many obstacles to obtaining good-quality, free legal advice, it is more important than ever that non-lawyers understand… Read more »

Thanks to a long-fought campaign by Asylum Aid and their Protection Gap advocates (which you can read about here) childcare for the asylum substantive interview is now available at all 8 hubs where substantive asylum interviews take place across the UK. Childcare is available for male and female single parents with children under 5 years old.