If your asylum, immigration or human rights application is refused by the Home Office, you may have the right to appeal.

Here’s a few things we thinks it’s useful for people to know if they’ve got an appeal hearing come up.

Observing appeal hearings is a strange, uncomfortable business. But It gives you a bit of distance that means you can think about procedures, timings, dynamics and how to communicate this information to people who need it, in a way that’s difficult if you’re personally involved.

When refugees and other migrants reach UK shores their struggle isn’t over, they encounter a ‘hostile environment’ that seeks to penalise and alienate them. When groups, like the Stansted 15, fight the injustices imposed by the UK Home Office they are prosecuted under terrorism offences. But solidarity can be a powerful tool.

The organisation Asylum Aid have made a great video that explains asylum appeals in a friendly and accessible way. Support Asylum Aid to get translations… Read more »

solidarity

At Right to Remain’s annual gathering in Sheffield last week, we got together many of the grassroots asylum and migrants support groups we work with and shared collective learning and experiences of navigating the UK’s asylum and immigration system.

One of the topics of discussion was fresh claims.

Not all immigration decisions have the right of appeal in the UK.

There is currently only the right of appeal within the UK if the Home Office refuse an application based on: an “international protection” claim (asylum or Humanitarian Protection applications); a decision to revoke refugee status or humanitarian protection; a decision that you have no right to remain under European law; or a human rights claim.

And not all applications based on human rights or protection grounds have a right of appeal in the UK.

The vast majority of women seeking asylum in Britain are survivors, too. They need to go to court to win their right to asylum. They are subjected not only to the toxic culture of disbelief confronting British survivors but to a deeply embedded culture of denial underpinned by racist and anti-refugee sentiment. And a new report by Asylum Aid is set to reveal how thoroughly that system is failing them.

Last night, activists blockaded Stansted Airport to stop the departure of the scheduled charter flight mass deportation to Nigeria and Ghana. At the time of writing, the blockade continues and the charter flight has not departed. Why have activists taken such a drastic action?

Charter flight removals/deportations are one of the shadiest aspects of the UK’s asylum and immigration process.

Shielded from public oversight, information protected from freedom of information requests, every month these ‘ghost flights’ forcibly remove people en masse from the UK.

From 1 December 2016, the “out of country” appeals regime is extended.

The government has announced that the appeal fees would revert to the previous level, and refunds would be made to those who had paid the increased fees.  The government will review the situation and secondary legislation would follow to “formalise the position as soon as possible”.