Asylum and immigration tribunal fees increase

Legal Updates

The government has announced that the appeal fees would revert to the previous level, and refunds would be made to those who had paid the increased fees.  The government will review the situation and secondary legislation would follow to “formalise the position as soon as possible”.

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Judicial reviews and preventing forced removal

Legal Updates

The Home Office published new enforcement instructions and guidance on 31 October 2016 on, among other things, judicial reviews and injunctions.

The new guidance limits even further the situations in which judicial review proceedings will lead to the Home Office suspending a forced removal or deportation.

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Released but not yet free: the Home Office immigration curfew system

Legal Updates

This post was written by Ravi Naik, Public and International Law Solicitor and Head of Public Law at ITN Solicitors.

Ravi acted for the Claimant in the “Gedi v SSHD” case discussed below.  This article (and the more detailed case analysis written for the Justice Gap) are part of Unlocking Detention, which runs until 18 December 2016.

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First of the huge court fee increases come into force

Legal Updates

It may not surprise you to learn that, following a public consultation over the proposed hike in immigration and asylum court fees during which lawyers, NGOs and the public warned the government the fees would severely impede access to justice and threaten the rule of law, the government is introducing said increase as of today, Monday 10 October 2016.

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New country guidance case on risk on return to Sudan

Legal Updates

Country guidance cases are asylum appeals chosen by the immigration tribunal to give legal guidance for a particular country, or a particular group of people in a particular country. The decisions in these cases are assumed to be based on the best possible evidence about that country at that time. Until there are significant changes in that country, a country guidance decision sets out the law for other asylum-seekers from that country.

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Home Office unlawfully imposed curfews: does this affect someone you know?

Legal Updates

There was a very important judgment from the Court of Appeal last week.

The judgment was in the case of Mr Gedi, who was represented by Tom Hickman of Blackstone Chambers instructed by Ravi Naik of ITN solicitors. 

The Court of Appeal found that the UK government has no power to impose a curfew either under powers for electronic monitoring or under general powers for conditions under the Immigration Act 1971.

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Asylum claims: Ethiopia

Legal Updates

We are often asked, “Do people get asylum if they are from [x or y country]?”

It’s impossible to generalise about how asylum claims will be decided – although the grant rate for some countries is higher than others, each asylum claim should (in theory) be decided on an individual, case-by-case basis. 

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Home Office asylum policy guidance: sexuality

Legal Updates

In February 2015, the Home Office issued new asylum policy guidance on sexual identity issues in asylum interviews.

This policy guidance can be seen as a positive step in Home Office attempts to address this unacceptable situation. Policy guidance, however, is not necessarily the same as what happens in practice.

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