Contacting the Further Submissions Unit

Legal Updates

If you have evidence you wish to submit to the Home Office to consider as a fresh claim after you are “appeal rights exhausted”, in most cases you need to make an appointment to submit the evidence in person at the Further Submissions Unit in Liverpool.

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Human rights cases: medical grounds

Legal Updates

In this context, we are talking about someone seeking the right to stay in the UK because they need medical treatment that is not available to them in their country of origin.

Cases involving human rights/medical grounds are particularly complicated, and often very distressing. 

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Thinking about evidence in family life, rights of the child cases

Legal Updates

At one of the training sessions we ran this week with volunteers who are keen to learn more and do more for people seeking the right to remain in the UK – we looked at evidence.  What ‘evidence’ means, in the context of asylum, immigration and human rights cases.  How someone can get this evidence, and how others can help them.  We discussed how important documentary evidence is, when so many legal cases are refused on the basis of credibility – the Home Office or the courts don’t believe you are telling the truth.

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Out-of-country appeals

Legal Updates

Not all immigration decisions have the right of appeal in the UK.

There is currently only the right of appeal within the UK if the Home Office refuse an application based on: an “international protection” claim (asylum or Humanitarian Protection applications); a decision to revoke refugee status or humanitarian protection; a decision that you have no right to remain under European law; or a human rights claim.

And not all applications based on human rights or protection grounds have a right of appeal in the UK.

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Surviving Disbelief & Denial: women in the asylum appeals process

Legal Updates

The vast majority of women seeking asylum in Britain are survivors, too. They need to go to court to win their right to asylum. They are subjected not only to the toxic culture of disbelief confronting British survivors but to a deeply embedded culture of denial underpinned by racist and anti-refugee sentiment. And a new report by Asylum Aid is set to reveal how thoroughly that system is failing them.

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