Home Office decision

ⓘ Information card

The Home Office may take many months to make a decision on your asylum claim. In 2019, most decisions took more than six months.

If the Home Office make a positive decision on your asylum claim, you will be granted leave to remain in the UK. You will be granted Refugee Status or Humanitarian Protection, or sometimes another form of leave to remain.

If your asylum application is refused by the Home Office, you are likely to have the right to appeal that decision (see next stage on the board). Most people are refused by the Home Office.

However, you will not have the right of appeal in the UK if your asylum claim has been “certified” by the Home Office and put in the “non-suspensive appeals” category because they think your claim is “clearly unfounded”. See Screening Interview section of the Right to Remain Toolkit for more information.

If your asylum claim is certified, you may be able to appeal the negative decision on your application from outside of the UK. It may also be possible to challenge the certification of your claim through a judicial review. This is a form of legal challenge that is different from an appeal, as it looks at the way a decision was made rather than whether the decision was correct. Read more at the Judicial Reviews section of the Right to Remain Toolkit.

See Right to Remain Toolkit sections Asylum Decision and After a Home Office Refusal for more information.

Now read the problem card below. Discuss with a friend (or have a think if you’re doing this on your own) what you might be able to do in this situation. When you have finished discussing/thinking, click to reveal a suggested action.

⚠️ Problem card

You get a long and confusing letter from the Home Office saying that they do not believe the things you have told them, and they are refusing your asylum application.

(Most people are refused by the Home Office: over the last few years, around 60% of asylum claims were refused by the Home Office).