Our 2019: a year in review

News

Tempting as it is to not look back at this year, it’s important to remember the small successes, and how we’ve survived this year to fight for a better one.

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New video: understanding case law

Legal Updates

The latest video from our series on understanding the UK asylum and immigration system – this one is on understanding case law.

Find out what it is, where to find it, and how to use it in your legal case.

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Uganda’s anti-LGBT+ law may be back

Legal Updates

According to the Ethics and Integrity Minister Simon Lokodo, the Ugandan government is intending to re-table the Anti-Homosexuality Bill, that threatened to become law five years ago.

Reuters news agency reports that the bill will be re-introduced in parliament in the coming weeks and is expected to be voted on before the end of the year.

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Iraq country information: targeting of individuals

Legal Updates

In March 2019, the European Asylum Support Office released a report on Iraq, specifically on the targeting of individuals.

Although this report was published more than six months ago, it was referenced just this week by an immigration judge in the First-tier Tribunal, who said he intended to use it as part of his judgment.

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Brand new videos about the UK asylum system

News

We are very excited to announce the launch of brand new videos about the UK asylum system, a joint project between Refugee Info Bus, Right to Remain and Sara Khayat Art Work.

Based on the Right to Remain Toolkit, with translations by Refugee Info Bus and with stunning animation by Sara, these videos will help people understand their rights at crucial stages of the asylum process.

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New Home Office guidance on asylum interviews

Legal Updates

In June 2019, the Home Office updated its internal guidance on conducting asylum (substantive interviews).

The guidance is a really useful document to read. Although sadly Home Office practice currently falls far short of what is supposed to happen on paper (see our news blog for more on this), it’s helpful for people to know what should and shouldn’t be happening in their interviews. When you know what is meant to be done, it is easier to challenge (either at the time, or subsequently) behaviour that goes against the guidance.

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